Enjambment and Janet Cooper

Janet Cooper is an extraordinary woman. Artist and world traveller, Janet collects no dust! Below are fotos of her wearing the Muy Marcottage dress “Enjambment” worn during her various travels including to the Easter Islands, Palermo, Valencia, Japan, El Camino de Santiago, and New York.

janet at los ojos

Janet visiting Studio Los Ojos in Rome wearing a hat she created herself.

Below is a post about Janet reblogged from ART FOR HOUSEWIVES blog in 2013.

 

Art Narratives by Cynthia Korzekwa

Janet Cooper is a friend and one of my favorite artists. She also owns the Muy Marcottage dress “Enjambment” and gave me a thrill by having herself photographed in the dress in various situations.  Scroll below to see some of these fotos.

Enjambment” dress on exhibit, Paros

Janet’s incredible dresses

Janet Cooper

more of Janet’s dresses “Birds & Babies”and “Blossoms”

Janet Cooper

Janet wearing “Enjambment” surrounded by her delightful art dresses at the  Die Formeister Exhibition.

 Janet Cooper’s CHAIRS at the  Die Formeister Exhibition.

 Janet At the MOMA Opening for the Quay Bros Exhibit  (Janet loves hats!)

Janet  wore “Enjambment” while walking the last few miles of the El Camino de Santiago.

The term “enjambment” is a literary term.  It indicates a line in poetry that continues going on beyond a line-break thus, in a certain way, goes beyond its boundaries.  Just…

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Muy Marcottage purses

Art Narratives by Cynthia Korzekwa

Every summer while on Paros, I try to make purses using my  household trash.

“Clean Clutch”
clean clutch, muy marcottage

front
clean clutch, muy marcottage

 back

This is a little clutch made from a transparent detergent bottle. I cut the bottle open then used scrap materials to crochet the missing part. There’s a flap that opens on the front kept in place by velcro.

 “Piselli Purse”

piselli bag, muy marcottagepiselli bag, muy marcottage

Another plastic bag purse.  The base is from heavier plastic whereas the “ruffles” are from flimsier bags.   It’s named “Piselli” (peas) because of the pea picture from a frozen food bag appliqued on.

“Chupas Bag”

Chupas purse

On one of my walks to Krios, I found this deflated plastic football and decided to transform it into a purse.

Chupas purse

Not liking the brown, I sewed on strips of plastic from garden dirt bags.  The rest was made from plastic bags.  Maybe when I get back this spring, I will make some additional changes.

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The House of Mirth

Art Narratives by Cynthia Korzekwa

More MUY MARCOTTAGE:


While sewing on this dress, for some unknown reason, I thought about Lily Bart.

Many years ago, I accompanied my daughter to Aix-in-Provence for a language course.  My reading companion was Edith Wharton’s THE HOUSE OF MIRTH.  Published in 1905, the book gets its title from Ecclesiastes 7:4: The heart of the wise is in the house of mourning; but the heart of fools is in the house of mirth.


The protagonist is Lily Bart, 29 and unmarried. Lily will not marry the man she really loves because he is not rich thus dedicates her time trying to find a wealthy husband.  Unfortunately, Lily sabotages all of her possibilities for marriage as she unwittingly gets involved in a scandal that will eternally ruin her.

I remember quite well the night I finished reading THE HOUSE OF MIRTH because I cried and cried…

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Soda Can Sequins Huipil

Soda Can Sequins Huipil

Why not use old soda cans to make sequins? It’s quite easy to do with a hole puncher but they are then too tiny for me to work with. So I just cut up a can into little squares then rounded the edges with scissors. The aluminum can be pierced easily by a needle when sewing them onto a piece of fabric.

This “huipil” was made from a discarded black top. The ruffles are from a Valentino dress given to me by my friend Franky! And visible stitching (white on black!) was used to hem the edges.

Even clothes have to have names if you want to be friends with them so “soda can sequins” was embroideried on with yellow thread given to me by my mom years ago.

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Appliqué as a Form of Play

Appliqued Sweater

My Ugly Duckling Sweater is now a Swan.

This boring grey sweater was in my drawer taking up space. No doubt Marie Kondo would have brutally thrown in into a bin. But I am more kind hearted than Marie and decided to give my rejected sweater a second chance. So, armed with scraps from my stash, scissors, and thread, I did some abracadabra and turned something dull into something animated and fun to wear.

One of the major sources of worldwide pollution comes from the fashion industry. The most sustainable kind of fashion is that of taking something old and making it new again.

Appliqué is a great way to play. The French word “appliquer” means “to apply” and that’s what you do, apply one piece of cloth to another. Like patchwork and boro, appliqué was initially a means of repairing worn out or damaged fabric.

Mending is a form of aesthetics.

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Carine Lègeret

The artist Carine Lègeret models Muy Marcottage on Paros!

"Sky" Muy Marcottage dress

“SKY” Muy Marcottage dress

Carine Lègeret wearing Muy Marcottage

 Carine  wearing the Muy Marcottage dress θέλημα (will/errand)

Carine Lègeret wearing Muy Marcottage

with the Aegean sea in the background, Carine wearing “Sigh” Muy Marcottage dress…some people make you sigh, some do not

Carine Lègeret wearing Muy Marcottage

“No Expectations” Muy Marcottage dress

Carine Lègeret wearing Muy Marcottage

“Enjoy” Muy Marcottage dress

 

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