Enjambment and Janet Cooper

Janet Cooper is an extraordinary woman. Artist and world traveller, Janet collects no dust! Below are fotos of her wearing the Muy Marcottage dress “Enjambment” worn during her various travels including to the Easter Islands, Palermo, Valencia, Japan, El Camino de Santiago, and New York.

janet at los ojos

Janet visiting Studio Los Ojos in Rome wearing a hat she created herself.

Below is a post about Janet reblogged from ART FOR HOUSEWIVES blog in 2013.

 

Art Narratives by Cynthia Korzekwa

Janet Cooper is a friend and one of my favorite artists. She also owns the Muy Marcottage dress “Enjambment” and gave me a thrill by having herself photographed in the dress in various situations.  Scroll below to see some of these fotos.

Enjambment” dress on exhibit, Paros

Janet’s incredible dresses

Janet Cooper

more of Janet’s dresses “Birds & Babies”and “Blossoms”

Janet Cooper

Janet wearing “Enjambment” surrounded by her delightful art dresses at the  Die Formeister Exhibition.

 Janet Cooper’s CHAIRS at the  Die Formeister Exhibition.

 Janet At the MOMA Opening for the Quay Bros Exhibit  (Janet loves hats!)

Janet  wore “Enjambment” while walking the last few miles of the El Camino de Santiago.

The term “enjambment” is a literary term.  It indicates a line in poetry that continues going on beyond a line-break thus, in a certain way, goes beyond its boundaries.  Just…

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Carine Lègeret

The artist Carine Lègeret models Muy Marcottage on Paros!

"Sky" Muy Marcottage dress

“SKY” Muy Marcottage dress

Carine Lègeret wearing Muy Marcottage

 Carine  wearing the Muy Marcottage dress θέλημα (will/errand)

Carine Lègeret wearing Muy Marcottage

with the Aegean sea in the background, Carine wearing “Sigh” Muy Marcottage dress…some people make you sigh, some do not

Carine Lègeret wearing Muy Marcottage

“No Expectations” Muy Marcottage dress

Carine Lègeret wearing Muy Marcottage

“Enjoy” Muy Marcottage dress

 

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Copyright © 2012 Cynthia Korzekwa. All Rights Reserved

Lyn Shakespeare

Actress, singer, and comedian, Lyn Shakespeare is A One Woman Show! Entertaining, enthusiastic, and full of good vibrations, it’s impossible not to enjoy her company. And when Lyn told me she’d done stand-up comedy in Australia for several years, I was impressed. Because anyone who can make you laugh is magical. And powerful!

micky huipil b

Laughter is good for your health, both mental and physical. Laughter helps release endorphins that transform a bad mood into a good one. Laughter also decreases stress hormones, lowers blood pressure, boosts immunity, and decreases pain. A comedian is almost like a doctor!

Lyn ShakespeareLyn Shakespeare

But whereas laughing can loosen you up, trying to make others laugh can make you tight. Because making people laugh is not always easy. Which is why Lyn is so amazing.

Petite and impish, Lyn reminds me of a young Judy Garland making me even more curious about her as a comedian. So I bombarded her with questions:

Lyn Shakespeare

Q: When you did stand-up, what were your jokes based on? Did you make fun of yourself  or, like Joan Rivers, make fun of others? How did you come up with your material?

Lyn: I wrote a routine about growing up with the name Shakespeare. And over the years, this became a big part of my routine. I would steal jokes and rewrite them to make them mine.  A lot of my humour definitely belongs in the “gay” arena, which is where I have had my most successful and happiest of gigs. And where I can be totally outrageous .

Lyn Shakespeare

I don’t like cruel comedy e.g. Joan Rivers, although she is as cruel about herself as she is on the public! I do remember a few times in the past “outing” people and thinking later on that I could have done better !!  And not have been sooooooo mean !! ( although they probably deserved it !! )

Observation of life is a great way to come up with comedy.  People that you meet along the way, who definitely need to be sent up !!!

Lyn Shakespeare

Q: What was the most difficult thing about doing stand-up?

Lyn:   After performing much cabaret and always with piano player,  I realized that stand-up is a lonely beast!!  Although when it was a brilliant night and you and the audience were “one”, it was the best  of nights.  I remember one of my first gigs was when I was dressed as Jessica Rabbit ( god knows why !! ) and it was just the worst gig and as I walked off stage, my microphone was still on and I said to the stage manager “The audience hates me !! “ and then I heard the audience roar with laughter.  They had all heard my comment. Accidental humour !!

Lyn Shakespeare

Q:  Give a brief description of going to the Oscars.

Lyn: My dear friend, Mr. Cha Cha, choreographer for the films Moulin RougeStrictly BallroomRomeo and Juliet, and many others, had been asked to choreograph two numbers from the film Enchanted which he had choreographed as well.  He had 2 tickets  for the Oscars so I told him I was going with him!!! And, hoping to use the experience for a future skit, I wrote about our L.A. journey: Getting Ready for the Oscars, Walking the Red Carpet, Watching The Oscars, The Governor’s Ball.  The Mayhem, The Madness, The Glamour, The Scary Faces, The Amazing Night of Nights!

Lyn Shakespeare

Q : Why do you like wearing Muy Marcottage?

Lyn: The easiest of all questions. I love them. They are so theatrical. They are all individual pieces. They  are born from recycled fabrics. They are so much fun. They are created with LOVE.

Lyn Shakespeare

The  photos of Lyn wearing Muy Marcottage dresses were taken on Paros by the photographer Chiara Pilar.

Lyn Shakespeare

 

Cynthia Korzekwa  © & Chiara Pilar  ©

“Lupe” dress

LUPE dress worn by Genie

Genie modelling “Lupe” dress on the terrace of La Sussurrata, Paros.

LUPE dress by Muy Marcottage

On December 12, 1531, an indigenous shepherd by the name of Juan Diego saw the Virgin Mary. Not only was she dressed in indigenous attire, she spoke to Juan in his own indigenous language. She asked Juan to build a temple in her honor and, as a souvenir of their encounter, left her image imprinted on his cloak. And this was the beginning of the cult of the Virgen de Guadalupe.

Today La Virgen de Guadalupe is undoubtedly the most popular Mexican icon. Her image can be found on just about everything from T-shirts to coffee cups to hand fans to key chains, etc.

Before the Spaniards invaded Mexico, the indigenous people had other gods.  Then the Catholic Spaniards imposed their god turning faith into dogma. But when Juan saw the Catholic Mary who dressed and talked like him and was even brown skinned like him, an important change took place. Juan’s vision transformed an alien presence and made it local. Worship was once again personalized.

a souvenir T-shirt attached to a peplum

fabric print with calla lilies and indigenous people (Frida Kahlo’s husband, Diego Rivera, loved to paint calla lilies)…appropriation is everywhere

peplum & gussets

"Lupe" Dress by Muy Marcottage

To make it easier to get into the dress, an opening in the back.

"Lupe" Dress by Muy Marcottage

Lupe” is the diminutive of Guadalupe and a popular female name in Mexico. It’s a great dress for dancing especially to Little Latin Lupe Lu!

Moral of the story: personalize the world and make it yours!

Mal Oo

Cynthia Korzekwa  ©

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“Why Not Grow Something?” huipil

"Why Not Grow Something?" huipil & skirt

Marina van Koesveld, (artist, tarot card reader, and magical thinker) is wearing “Why Not Grow Something?”

"Why Not Grow Something" Huipil

Clothing is also about identity thus, as with all Muy Marcottage garments, a personal philosophy is expressed. The primary concern here is that for Earth, the planet we call home. Demographics and greed have put us all in danger as natural resources are being abused. The fashion industry is a major culprit. So why make more clothes when we can re-invent the clothes we already have Bricolage Style?

The top of “Why Not Grow Something?” is a patchwork of white fabric pieces that are assembled in a huipil like form then hand painted. Visible stitching underlines the fact that the fabric is an entity made from parts.

The top part of the skirt is made from a pair of wacked off pants.  The rest of the skirt is made from more fabric pieced together then hand painted with a motif that mimics the print on the pants.

Pears, grapes, pineapples—fruit right out of the Garden of Eden. Fruit that is not only beautiful to the eye but provides nourishment as well. Unfortunately, food resources are becoming more and more of a problem. The demand is surpassing the supply.

It would help a lot if those with the adequate space tried to grow at least 10% of their food. Lettuce grown on balconies, herbs on the windowsill, fruit trees in the backyard would all contribute towards de-stressing our demands. Homegrown also means safer produce, a lower food budget, and the pleasure of growing something. Thus the name of this huipil, “Why Not Grow Something?”

Details.

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“Freshness Is Not Eternal” Huipil

Freshness Is Not Eternal

One morning while sitting in the kitchen searching for meaning in life, I noticed that the oranges in the fruit bowl were getting mushy. The firm plumpness they had when I bought them had disappeared. With this realization, I had an epiphany —life is ephemeral– so I needed to get up and get with the program before it was too late.

This huipil was made from pieces of white cotton stitched together to be used as a canvas for a drawing made with water-resistant markers. Hand-painting, appliqué, and hand-stitching are used to further embellish the huipil. The back is a patchwork of colorful fabric scraps.

The model is also wearing a paper bead necklace and a bracelet made from ballpoint pen caps.

Freshness Is Not Eternal Huipil

On this model, the huipil is oversized so it falls off her shoulder when she dances!

Freshness Is Not Eternal Huipil

Note the necklace made from old T-shirts.

Details.

Freshness Is Not Eternal

Point of departure sketch. The huipil was made c. 2010.

Photographer, Chiara Pilar

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“Feminist” huipil

Here’s my friend, Marina, modelling for me once again. She’s wearing a huipil I made from an old pair of sweat pants and lace remnants my mom gave me. The red stitching running across the front reads “feminist“.

Not long ago, while discussing animatedly, a male friend of mine called me a feminist as if being a feminist was something bad. But a feminist is simply a woman who tries to protect her rights and the rights of other women. So why do so many men have a problem with this?

We live in a world excessively masculinized were women are treated as inferiors. It was not always this way. Once, when life was considered sacred, women were revered for their major contribution to the life cycle.

The concept of democracy has been around for c 2,500 years but women have been voting only for the past 100. This means that for 2,400 years society has evolved dominated by male and not female values.  And we see where that has taken us!

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Once upon a time, the many cultures of this world were all part of the gynocratic age. Paternity had not yet been discovered, and it was thought … that women bore fruit like trees—when they were ripe. Childbirth was mysterious. It was vital. And it was envied. Women were worshipped because of it, were considered superior because of it…. Men were on the periphery—an interchangeable body of workers for, and worshippers of, the female center, the principle of life.

The discovery of paternity, of sexual cause and childbirth effect, was as cataclysmic for society as, say, the discovery of fire or the shattering of the atom. Gradually, the idea of male ownership of children took hold….

Gynocracy also suffered from the periodic invasions of nomadic tribes…. The conflict between the hunters and the growers was really the conflict between male-dominated and female-dominated cultures.

… women gradually lost their freedom, mystery, and superior position. For five thousand years or more, the gynocratic age had flowered in peace and productivity. Slowly, in varying stages and in different parts of the world, the social order was painfully reversed. Women became the underclass, marked by their visible differences.

from Gloria Steinem’s “Wonder Woman

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Marina Making Ripples

One Drop Makes Many Ripples

Marina van Koesveld is a magical thinker. With her thoughts she’s able to create new realities.  When Marina was younger, she’d dress as Frida (long before the craze) maybe because the two had much in common. Both  are painters.  And both are sensual with long dark hair and eyes that can perforate you like laser beams.

Here she is wearing the huipil dress One Drop Makes Many Ripples.  The dress is made from a second hand cloth that, maybe, was used as a towel.

“Flowing” in and out of the dress is a strand of pieced cloth. The fabric design reminded me of drops of water so I embroidered the phrase One Drop Makes Many Ripples around the collar.

one-drop9-b

The motion of everyday life creates ripples—one action produces other actions. Thus ripples connect us one to the other.  That’s why it’s important to be aware that our actions—be they physical or psychological—affect the lives of those around us.

Ripples are everywhere.

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